The Matthew and Alisa Group Home Buying Process Class was a Success!

This is a quick blog thanking everyone one for joining us at last night’s Home Buying Process Class!

We had a great turn out of buyers eager to learn about the home buying process. Matthew Gaskill and Alisa Peterson discussed the market conditions to give everyone an understanding of what to expect when searching to buy property this season. With properties going under-agreement as soon as they hit the market, we wanted to make sure that buyers understand how quickly they need to move to buy property.

Joe Smith, a knowledgeable lender from Guaranteed Rate explained what lenders look for when someone applies for a mortgage and the different types of loan programs available to homebuyers, both first-time home buyers and more seasoned  home buyers. He knows just as well as we do how competitive the market is right now and without proper financial backing (i.e. pre-approval letter), sellers won’t even consider the offer.

The wonderful David Datz, Esq., a real estate attorney, explained how important it is to assemble the right team to guide you through this process. This is one of the biggest purchases you can make and it is essential to have knowledgable professionals to explain what you are buying and what you are signing.

Thank you again to Stella Restaurant for providing delicious food and a great space for us to host our class. As you can see from the video, we had quite a few eager buyers ready to learn about the home buying process and I know there are more that were not able to make it.  We will be planning another class in month or two. If you are interested in attending, please subscribe to our newsletter and subscribe to our blog and we will keep you posted on our next class. These classes are meant for anyone interested in learning about the buying process in the current Boston real estate sales market. If you are a first-time home buyer, third-time home buyer, or an investor, you are welcome to join us and learn something new!

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Home Buying Process Class at Stella in Boston’s South End

Whether you are a first-time home buyer, a seventh-time home buyer, or an investor, this class is for you. Matthew Gaskill and Alisa Peterson, along with David Datz Esq., and Joe Smith from Guaranteed Rate will be hosting a class that will discuss the different aspects of buying property.

Matthew Gaskill and Alisa Peterson will be discussing the search and offer process, along with the current sales market. With the market being incredibly dynamic, we want to manage expectations, calm fears, and even help you decide if buying now is the right decision for you. Buying property now is not for everyone, but if it is for you, we want get you excited to get started on your search.

Joe Smith from Guaranteed Rate will be discussing the financing process. Financing is crucial in this market and Joe Smith will help you understand what is needed and what to expect.

David M. Datz, Esq. from David Marshall Datz P.C. law offices will explain everything from the legal standpoint of your real estate transaction and explain how we keep your interests protected.

Home Buying Process Class at StellaThe class will be at the restaurant Stella in the South End from 5:30-7pm on Tuesday January 29th 2013. We will have light refreshments and appetizers. We will have a Q&A session after our speeches, so please come with a pen, notebook, and any question you have about the home buying process. Please RSVP by January 24th by contacting Alisa Peterson at alisa.peterson@gibsonsir.com if you are interested in attending.

We are heading into another exciting real estate season and we want to get you as excited as we are!

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Pie in the Sky Event: The True Spirit of Thanksgiving

Every Thanksgiving, my family went around the table and said what we were most thankful for. I am sure this is a tradition many families share and it is a simple way to remind us of how lucky we are to be surrounded by food, friends, and family. It is in this spirit that Matthew Gaskill and myself volunteer our time and whatever resources we can use to helping others. Once again, we are volunteering for Community Servings’s Pie in the Sky. This is an wonderful event that brings the community together in the true spirit of Thanksgiving.

Since 1990, Community Servings has provided meals to those who are critically ill and their families in 18 cities and towns all over Massachusetts. These are people battling with HIV/AIDS, cancer, kidney disease, and other illnesses that make them too sick and weak to be able to shop or cook for themselves.

We are selling pies for $25 from the best chefs, restaurants, caterers, and hotels all over Massachusetts and $.90 of every $1 goes directly to Community Servings. Sure you could find pies available for a little less, but this $25 buys a pie and feeds a family for a week. Pie in the Sky began in 1993 when so many in the restaurant community lost friends and co-workers to the HIV/AIDS virus. Knowing how much food can change a person emotionally and physically, some of these people started Pie in the Sky. Since then hundreds of restaurants and volunteers have taken time to bake pies, sell pies, deliver pies, and whatever else is needed. This event raises 15% of Community Servings’s annual private fundraising revenue!

Pie in the Sky Event from Community ServingsPies are only available to those in Massachusetts who can pick them up in person at any of 63 pick up locations (14 of which are in Boston). However, anyone can donate a pie to one of Community Servings’ 1,300 clients in need or donate directly to Community Servings. Pies available are the traditional flavors of Thanksgiving; apple, pecan, pumpkin, and sweet potato.

Go to our team site to buy a pie or donate! Last day to order is 11/17/12.

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A Brief History of Fenway Park on its 100th Anniversary

One hundred years ago tomorrow, the Red Sox, Boston’s most beloved sports franchise, moved into its current home. Over the span of the past century, Fenway Park has served as an entertainment center for the people of Boston. The park is referred to by many as a “cathedral of baseball” is the oldest stadium in use by a Major League Baseball club and is considered one of the most well-known sports venues in the world. The Red Sox are hosting a free open house at Fenway Park today from 9am-7pm with fans having access to the warning track, the inside of the Green Monster, and other areas inside the park not normally available to fans. Current and past Red Sox players will be on hand for autographs as fans are allowed to tour the historic building at their own pace. The following history of Fenway Park is a brief primer to get you ready for today’s Fenway Park open house.

100th Anniversary of Fenway ParkAnd do not forget Friday’s 100th Anniversary game against the New York Yankees has a 3pm start time with a nod to the time games started before the days of stadium lights and night games. The pre-game ceremony will feature 1912 throwback jerseys, over 200 past players, and a stadium-wide toast that will attempt to break the record for largest ever toast. The Red Sox ask for everyone to be in their seats by 2pm to take part in the toast.

Opening Day at Fenway Park

Fenway Park hosted its first game on April 9th, 1912, an exhibition between the Red Sox and Harvard, a game won by the professionals. The regular season opener was scheduled for April 17th, but the game was rained out. Three more games, including the traditional morning and afternoon game doubleheader held to concur with the Boston marathon, were also cancelled. After the rain subsided, at least one of these games could have been played, but fans were turned away amid sunshine and clear skies because the field was declared unplayable, left uncovered during the storm because a new tarp had yet to arrive.

After the delays to Opening Day, Fenway Park hosted its first Major League contest on April 20th, 1912. Navin Field in Detroit, which was later known as Tiger Stadium, also debuted on the same day, and the two ballparks shared the distinction of the oldest stadium in MLB until Tiger Stadium was demolished in 2009. This leaves Fenway Park as one of only two “classic” ballparks in use, the other being Wrigley Park in Chicago.

Fenway Park grass painted to commemorate 100 year anniversaryWith ongoing coverage of the Titanic disaster, the enthusiasm for Boston’s new stadium was somewhat dampened in the days leading up to its opening. Two days after the Titanic survivors arrived in New York, Bostonians showed up in force for Fenway Park’s official opening. John “Honey Fitz” Fitzgerald, mayor of Boston and grandfather of future president John Fitzgerald Kennedy, threw out the first pitch, as he would also do at one of the World Series games held in Boston in the fall of 1912.

The 24,000 fans in attendance for Opening Day went home happy as the club defeated their rival New York Highlanders (renamed the Yankees the following year) 7-6 on an 11th inning single by Tris Speaker. Among those in attendance were the Royal Rooters, considered the rowdiest fans in baseball. The club was led by a man named “Nuf Ced” McGreevey, who has the distinction of tending America’s first sports bar, The Third Base Saloon. This establishment where “you went before heading home” was a museum of Red Sox memorabilia McGreevey obtained from his friends on the Red Sox roster.

Although praised for its intimacy today, fans in 1912 were not used to seats as far from the action as those found in the right field of Fenway Park. Despite this criticism, overall reception at the time was positive. Fenway Park solidified its place in Boston that first season when the Red Sox won 105 games and captured the World Series. By winning three more championships in the next six years, this dynasty further ingrained Fenway Park into the city’s identity.

The Real Estate Behind Fenway Park

The Red Sox moved to Fenway Park from the smaller Huntington Avenue Grounds, which sat on what is now the site of an indoor athletic facility on the Northeastern University campus. As with most real estate transactions, money played a role. The Huntington Avenue Grounds had hosted approximately 10,000 fans for its largest crowd ever even though the official capacity was much less. Along with Fenway Park’s additional seating and the increased revenue from more fans, a new park in an attractive area would increase the club’s value, an important consideration since owner John Taylor was entertaining thoughts of selling the Red Sox.

Yawkey Way, home to the Red Sox, Boston's American League Baseball ClubIn early 1911, Taylor’s family, which earned their fortune through real estate, was involved with several real estate entrepreneurs in forming a committee focused on developing the emerging Fenway neighborhood. Two weeks after the forming of The Fenway Improvement Association, Taylor’s father bought the future site of Fenway Park at public auction. The Fens were largely undeveloped at the time, but the location was only a few blocks from growing Kenmore Square and the intersection of Commonwealth Avenue and Beacon Street, major thoroughfares at the beginning of the twentieth century much as they are today. After the site was secured, Taylor decided to relocate and not to renew his lease for the Huntington Avenue Grounds. With plans to develop a new ballpark underway, Taylor sold half the club with the contract naming him the overseer of construction and landlord of the new ballpark. John Taylor claimed the name Fenway Park came from the stadium’s location in the Fenway neighborhood, however, considering Taylor’s family owned Fenway Realty Co. the ballpark’s name could be the first example of stadium-naming rights in North America.

Design and Construction of Fenway Park

In the preceding years, the MFA, the Isabella Stewart Garner Museum, and Symphony Hall were all built roughly a mile from the site that would become Fenway Park. While those buildings were built by the city’s Irish working class, they were intended for the enjoyment of the Brahmins and the other members of Boston’s elite class. Fenway Park, by contrast, would be built for the people of Boston.

Fenway park plaque commemorating construction in 1912 and remodeling in 1934Fires had destroyed a number of wooden ballparks in the previous two decades including the double-decked South End Grounds, home of Boston’s National League club. One result a the fires was a move toward steel and concrete stadiums, a new wave which began in 1909 and included stadiums such as Ebbets Field, Comisky Park, and Wrigley Field.

For Boston’s first steel and concrete ballpark, Taylor hired James McLaughlin as chief architect and the civil engineering was done by Osborn Engineering, a large firm based in Cleveland. Osborn Engineering was a major player in the stadium boom of the early twentieth century, designing Navin Field simultaneously, a few years later involved in the construction of Braves Field, Boston’s other modern major league ballpark, and then designing Yankee Stadium in the early 1920’s.

Ground was broken on September 25th,1911, the day permits were granted for construction of Fenway Park. The total cost of the project would be $650,000 which at $15.7 million in 2012 dollars is an amazing real estate value, especially when you consider the current ownership group spent $285 million on renovations over the last ten years.

Fenway Park was built on the lot John Taylor’s father had purchased at auction, an irregular-shaped parcel of 365,308 square feet. The field could have been built in a more symmetrical shape by only using part of the parcel, but Taylor instructed the architect to use the entire lot. The result was a field much larger than required by the game as it was played at the time, an era known as the Dead Ball Era. Prior to the 1920’s, the preferred style of play consisted of line drives and hit-and-run plays. In fact, the year prior to Fenway park’s opening saw Frank Baker lead the American League with 11 home runs and entire clubs hit less than 20 home runs over the course of the year.

Survey of Fenway Park lot in 1917

Because no one hit the ball that far, it was not an issue for the left-field fence to be placed against Landsdowne Street, only 300ft from home plate. The architect was instructed to maintain the alignment of the Huntington Avenue Grounds with the 3rd base line pointing almost due north, which kept the sun from batters’ eyes during games that began at 3pm, the standard start time of games in the era. If distance had been a concern, Landsdowne Street could have been acquired and incorporated into the design. By 1958, this was not the case as owner Tom Yawkey tried unsuccessfully to annex Landsdowne Street for expansion and renovation of Fenway Park.

Along Landsdowne Street, a wall was built that would be the precursor of the Green Monster, Fenway Park’s signature feature. The wall was 25ft high, a wooden wall plastered with ads and was built for a couple of reasons. The parcel of land the park was built on was sloped and after being graded, the field was lower than the surrounding streets. The wall served to both hold back Landsdowne Street and kept nonpaying fans from watching the game for free.

1918 version of Monster Seats were in the field of play on Duffy's CliffA slope of dirt on the field side of the wall was used to further support the wall. This slope became known as Duffy’s Cliff after star Red Sox left-fielder Duffy Lewis, who became adept at playing the unusual feature. Although technically in play, many fans watched the game seated in the field of play on the 10ft embankment because it provided a good view of the action. To maximize seating for the 1912 World Series games bleachers seating a thousand fans were built on the embankment. Duffy was spared from navigating the crowd since any hits into the fans were ruled a ground-rule double.

The wall has seen a number of changes over the years before becoming the Green Monster we know today.

  • In 1934, a manual scoreboard was added and the wall was covered in concrete and tin.
  • In 1947, the ads were removed from the wall and it was painted green to match the rest of the park.
  • In 1976, the wall was covered in a hard plastic.
  • In 2003, seats were added to the top of the wall. These seats, known as “monster seats,” are among the most popular in all of Fenway Park and are sold on a per game basis to winners of a lottery instead of in season-ticket packages. In 2012, over 300,000 people applied for the roughly 30,000 seats available over the course of the season.

The wall at Fenway Park known as the Green MonsterBefore the seats were added to the top of the Green Monster, a net on top of the wall caught balls, protecting cars on the street below. Groundskeepers would climb a ladder built onto the wall to empty the net, and the “ladder to nowhere” remained attached to the wall. The “ladder to nowhere” is another quirk of Fenway Park, but it is an urban legend that the ladder is the only ground-rule triple in major league baseball.

The original plan for Fenway Park was for a double-deck park like Navin Field and the South End Grounds to allow for more fans and the revenue that would come with them. The plans for a second deck were put hold with the home opener only six months away. The final design used for construction called for a single uncovered grandstand surrounding the infield and bleachers in right field, but the plans left open the possibility for a second deck to be built in the future. However, not until an auxiliary press box was added for the 1946 All-star Game did Boston have its first double-decker ballpark since the South End Grounds were closed in 1914. Without the second deck, Fenway Park’s seating capacity was around 29,000, which was less than most other ballparks built around the same time, but Fenway Park was nearly three times the official capacity of Huntington Avenue Grounds.

After 84,000sf of grass was removed from the Huntington Avenue Grounds and transplanted in Fenway Park, baseball was ready to be played behind the new park’s depression-style red brick facade. The Kenmore Square area features buildings of similar architecture and height, allowing Fenway Park to blend in to its surroundings unlike other major sports venues. Unlike these structures imposing over their environment, Fenway has a markedly utilitarian appearance and the lack of bulk is also attributable to the field sitting below street level. A famous story tells of Roger Clemons to Boston in 1984 and taking a cab from Logan Airport to the ballpark. Once they arrived at Fenway Park, Clemons said to the taxi driver, “No, Fenway Park, it’s a baseball stadium. This is a warehouse.” Not until the driver told him to look up at the lights did Clemons believe he was outside a major league stadium.

The red-brick depression-style facade of Fenway Park

Changes to Fenway Park Over the Years

Fenway Park took its current shape in 1934 when new owner Tom Yawkey took over with the capital allowing him to spend lavishly toward rebuilding the park. Three months prior to opening day, a fire leveled much of the improvements and Yawkey redoubled efforts, hiring an army of workers during the height of The Depression. The project consisted of a seven month stretch of construction and after two fires set back progress Yawkey instituted an around-the-clock schedule. Yawkey’s improvements and renovations to Fenway Park were one of the largest depression-era construction projects in Boston, second only to the Tobin Bridge, and Yawkey’s use of union labor endeared him and his version of Fenway Park to Boston residents. The major changes Yawkey made to the ballpark in 1934 included:

  • Leveled Duffy’s Cliff.
  • Covered wall in concrete and tin. Yawkey also had his and his wife’s initials painted in Morse code on the wall where they remain today.
  • Installed a manual scoreboard in the base of the wall, which is the last hand-operated scoreboard in the American League.
  • Replaced wooden bleachers with concrete structures.

Changes continued over the years as seats were added and the outfield wall was moved to increase capacity. The last change to the playing field was when Yawkey built bullpens inside the right-field fence. Yawkey’s reasoning for the relocation of the bullpens, was to aid new star Ted Williams by pulling in the fence 23ft and making it easier for the right-handed hitter to hit ball out of the playing field. The area became known as Williamsburg, but Williams hit less than three dozen of his 521 home runs into the bullpens.

Fenway Park media box behind home plate

In 1999, plans were announced to demolish and rebuild Fenway. The public voiced stiff resistance despite ownership and Boston media (including Boston Globe columnist Bob Ryan) considering it inevitable. In 2002, a group led by John Henry, Tom Werner, and Larry Lucciano bought the Boston Red Sox and began engineering studies toward renovating Fenway Park. The group decided renovation was preferred over rebuilding and over the next ten years they spent $285 million on renovations and improvements. The result is a critically-acclaimed restoration project that succeeded in modernizing and expanding capacity without compromising the intimacy and character that make Fenway Park what it is. After renovations were declared complete in 2012, engineers estimated another 40-50 years of useful life.

Despite the current owners not planning for any additional major renovations, any future changes to Fenway Park will require a thorough permitting since it was announced in 2012 the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Another recent accolade for Fenway Park was when the American Institute of Architects placed Fenway Park on its list of 150 buildings that defined “The Shape of America.” One member of the AIA noted, “The odd thing about Fenway is that probably of the top 150 buildings that we’re dealing with on the list, this one exhibits the least sense of intentional design by one hand.”

Miscellaneous Fenway Park Facts

  • Fenway Park currently has over 700 consecutive sellouts and counting. The streak began on May 15, 2003 and in 2008 the Red Sox organization broke the Major League Baseball record of 456 consecutive sellouts.
  • Fenway Park leads all MLB stadiums in hot dog sales by selling 1.5 million Fenway Franks a year.
  • Fenway Park once housed a candlepin bowling alley below the ballpark. The bowling alley was removed during the recent renovations so management offices could be expanded, but wood from the lanes was repurposed for the countertops of a bar built on the right-field pavilion.
  • At one point, the owner of the New York Yankees held the mortgage on Fenway Park as collateral for a loan.
  • Prior to 2004 reengineering, heavy rains would cause Boston’s sewage drains to back up to the point where fish would be able to swim from the Charles River to the field at Fenway Park. Once the water drained, fish as big as a foot long would be left on the field.

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The Return of Boston Food Trucks

Parking Spaces Reserved for Boston Food TrucksIf you had searched, you may have found food trucks sparsely scattered throughout the city over the winter. Now that spring has sprung the official food truck season in Boston has begun! There will be more food trucks at more frequency and I could not be happier.

“What is so great about Boston food trucks?” you may ask. Well, the answer, my friend, is being made to order right around the corner. Boston food trucks offer fantastic variety of foods from vegetarian to bbq and gourmet cupcakes to frozen hoagies. The quick delicious meals food trucks offer are ideal for those on the go who do not have the time for a sit-down meal. Since the trucks do vary in location, day, and time, it is a wonderful way to add more options to the daily grind.

Due to the growing popularity of food trucks in Boston, Mayor Menino announced four new sites to begin this month. The first of these new sites will be in the Copley Square area of Back Bay at Stuart and Trinity. Even though trucks were here last year, this site has expanded to allow for three trucks. The second spot is located at the China Trade Building at Boylston Street across from the RMV and near the Loew’s Boston Common. This would be a great alternative to movie popcorn and Dunkin’ Donuts, not that there is anything wrong with either but it is nice to have on-the-go variety. The third location will be in the Financial District on the corner of Milk and Kilby and will have two food trucks. The fourth new location is in the South End at Tremont Street and Berkeley, which is great for me because it’s three blocks from the Gibson Sotheby’s International Realty office!

Visiting a Food Truck in Back BayNot everyone is excited for the added truck spots and extended times. Local small restaurants worry the food trucks will take away business. But variety is the spice of life and I feel there is room for both food trucks and established restaurants. In fact, since many of the food trucks have a strong fan base, they may bring in new business to the neighborhood.

Visit the City of Boston website for a complete list of the food truck locations and schedule.

Just like Boston itself, food trucks are not stagnant. The menus and locations are continuously changing. If you are interested in seeing property in an ever changing and exciting city, contact the Realtors of Matthew and Alisa Group Real Estate.

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South Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

I can’t help but notice the increased amounts of Kiss me I’m Irish t-shirts, Leprechaun hats, four-leaf clover pins, shamrock shakes, and green beer which means St. Patrick’s Day must be near. With St. Patrick’s Day comes the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, held every year in South Boston.

This year the parade will be Sunday March 18th, starting at 1pm. The parade route starts at West Broadway T stop and continues along West Broadway through East Broadway to East 4th, to East 5th and around Thomas Park. The parade continues down Telegraph Street over to Dorchester Street and concludes at Andrew Square.

Parade route of the St. Patrick's Day parade in South Boston

Why South Boston?

According to Allied War Veterans Council, the history of the parade goes back to the American Revolution. In 1776, 55 cannons traveled to Dorchester Heights from Fort Ticonderoga on General John Henry Knox’s orders. In an effort of bolstering the appearance of strength, trees were cut down, hollowed out, and blackened over fire to look like cannons. On March 17th, orders were given that in order to pass safely, you had to know the password, which was “St. Patrick.” The British, not knowing the password or that some of the cannons were trees, saw what they were up against and left Boston. This event became known as Evacuation Day.

St. Patrick’s Day parades have been going on in Boston since 1879, however it took until the community became interested in local history to start celebrating Evacuation Day along with St. Patrick’s Day and make it a city holiday in 1901. Which is also when the city constructed the Dorchester Heights Monument, the site where General Knox had positioned the cannons. With the popularity of the combination of St. Patrick’s Day and Evacuation Day, Suffolk County made it a holiday in 1938. Because of the large Irish population endorsing the holiday, a law declaring the holiday was signed in 1941 using both black and green ink.

For more history and information about the South Boston St. Patrick’s Day Parade, visit their site.

If you are interested in seeing property for sale in South Boston, contact the Realtors of Matthew and Alisa Group Real Estate.

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17th Annual Taste of the South End

On March 6th, 2012 at 7pm in the Boston Center for the Arts Cyclorama, 40 restaurants will participate in the 17th annual Taste of the South End. General admission tickets are $95 and include unlimited tastings from all 40 chefs’ tables and complimentary wine and cocktails. VIP tickets are also available for $150, which in addition to tastings and drinks, include early admission and access to the after party.

The proceeds for Taste of the South end go to AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, Inc. (AAC). Founded in 1983, AAC is New England’s first and largest AIDS organization. They focus on education, prevention, and providing health services to men, women, and children living with AIDS and HIV.

Participating Chef Gordon Hamersley of Hamersley’s Bistro has said “The Taste of the South End is Boston’s premier food & wine event in our neighborhood and it brings together all of the South End chefs for the AIDS Action Committee. It is a fine way to both raise money for a wonderful organization that does vital work in our community and also have fun saying hello to friends, neighbors, and colleagues. I would not miss this event for the world.”

Watch the following video for scenes from past Taste of the South End events.

For more information about the South End neighborhood or about property for sale in the South End, contact the Realtors of Matthew and Alisa Group Real Estate.

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Lights, Camera, Action! Filming in Boston

Boston has been captured on film for decades and as a Realtor and film junky, I find it fascinating to see how the city has changed over the years. In fact, one thing I like to do on a rainy day is watch movies filmed in Boston over time. First I watch a film from the 1960’s such as Boston Strangler with Tony Curtis or The Thomas Crown Affair with Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway. Then I watch a movie filmed in Boston from the last few years like Knight & Day with Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz or What’s Your Number? with Anna Faris. It’s amazing to see how much the city has changed, particularly Back Bay and Downtown, or how little Beacon Hill has changed. Many other movies filmed in Boston have the same effect, but I can watch the movies I mentioned and pay attention to the city instead of the plot.

Filming Knight & Day in South End BostonBoston has been the backdrop to Oscar-winning movies, blockbuster classics, Emmy-winning T.V. shows, and reality television such as MTV’s The Real World. Boston has a variety of architectural styles that make it a great location for filming any time period. For example, Boston’s well preserved historic architecture offers ideal locations for historic period pieces like Glory or Amistad. Boston’s continuous modern development also makes this city an ideal setting for films set in the future like Surrogates.

Along with it’s blend of historic and modern architecture Massachusetts lures filmmakers with tax incentives packages including a 25% production credit, a 25% payroll credit, and a sales tax exemption. To qualify for the payroll credit and sales tax exemption a project must spend $50,000 in Massachusetts. Spending over half of total budget or filming at least half of the principal photography days in Massachusetts makes a project eligible for the production credit. The program requirements are straightforward, have no annual or project caps, no residency requirements, and no extended schedule of credit payouts. Judging by the number of films shot in Boston over the last few years, it is safe to say Boston offers a favorable tax break.

From the architecture to the tax breaks, it’s no wonder Shonda Rhimes, creator of Grey’s Anatomy, chose Boston as the location to film the pilot of her new project “Gilded Lily’s.” The show will be a romantic period drama set in 1895 about the opening of the first luxury hotel in New York City. Filming in Boston will begin March 2012. According to the announcement made by the Patrick-Murray Administration’s Massachusetts Film Office (MFO) many people in Boston are very excited about the project, even though the show’s setting will be New York.

“This is a very exciting project for the Commonwealth. Massachusetts is the perfect place to set a story from the Gilded Age, an impressive and well-preserved period in the Commonwealth’s history,” said Lisa Strout, the Director of the Massachusetts Film Office.

“This is a great opportunity to showcase Massachusetts’ historical richness and the incredibly talented workforce that exists in the Commonwealth,” said Greg Bialecki, Secretary of Housing and Economic Development. “Our competitive tax credit program continues to bring top industry producers and filmmakers to the Bay State, creating significant job opportunities.”

To learn more about historic or modern real estate for sale in Boston, contact the Realtors of Matthew and Alisa Group Real Estate.

For more information about the Patrick-Murray Administration’s Massachusetts Film Office and it’s tax incentives, visit www.mafilm.org.

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